Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA)

An American immigration policy started by the Obama administration in June 2012 without the consent of the United States Congress that allows certain illegal immigrants to the United States who entered the country as minors to receive a renewable two-year period of deferred action from deportation and eligibility for a work permit.

September 5, 2017: DACA Repealed

Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced that the program is being repealed. Sessions added that implementation will be suspended for six months; DACA status and Employment Authorization Documents ("EAD") that expire during the next six months will continue to be renewed. DACA recipients with a work permit set to expire on or before March 5, 2018 will have the opportunity to apply for a two-year renewal if their application is received by USCIS by October 5, 2017. The approximately 800,000 immigrants who qualified enrolled in DACA will become eligible for deportation by the end of those six months.

A White House memo said that DACA recipients should "use the time remaining on their work authorizations to prepare for and arrange their departure from the United States."

June 16, 2017: Trump Admistration Moves to Repeal DACA

The United States Department of Homeland Security announced that it intended to repeal the executive order by the Barack Obama administration that expanded the DACA program, though the DACA program's overall existence would continue to be reviewed.

February 14, 2017: Daniel Ramirez Medina

A CNN report on the detention of 23-year-old Daniel Ramirez Medina in Northwest Detention Center, Tacoma, Washington following his arrest in his father's Des Moines, Washington home, observed that, "The case raises questions about what it could mean" for the 750,000 Dreamers, who had "received permission to stay under DACA."

As of June 2016: 844,931 Applications Received

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) had received 844,931 initial applications for DACA status, of which 741,546 (88%) were approved, 60,269 (7%) were denied, and 43,121 (5%) were pending. Over half of those accepted reside in California and Texas.

November 2014–February 2015: DACA Expansion Blocked

U.S. President Barack Obama attempted to expand DACA. However, in December 2014, Texas and 25 other states, all with Republican governors, sued in the District Court for the Southern District of Texas asking the court to enjoin implementation of both the DACA expansion and Deferred Action for Parents of Americans (DAPA, a similar program). Judge Andrew S. Hanen issued a preliminary injunction blocking the expansion from going into effect while the case, Texas v. United States, proceeds. After progressing through the court system, an equally divided (4-4) Supreme Court left the injunction in place, without setting any precedent. The court's temporary injunction did not affect the existing DACA. At the time, individuals were allowed to continue to come forward and request an initial grant of DACA or renewal of DACA under the guidelines established in 2012.

June 2012: DACA is Established

At the program's start, the Pew Research Center estimated that up to 1.7 million people might be eligible.




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